Measuring Success Toolkit

A new Web site offers a wide range of resources for health professionals who plan, monitor, or evaluate health programs. Called the Measuring Success Toolkit, the site is designed to be useful for people just starting out in health programming as well as professionals who are more advanced in the field.
Measuring Success Toolkit Photo
http://toolkits.urbanreproductivehealth.org/toolkits/measuring-success

A new Web site offers a wide range of resources for health professionals who plan, monitor, or evaluate health programs. Called the Measuring Success Toolkit, the site is designed to be useful for people just starting out in health programming as well as professionals who are more advanced in the field. The site can be accessed at:

http://toolkits.urbanreproductivehealth.org/toolkits/measuring-success

An online forum is planned on September 19-21, 2012, for professionals from all levels to discuss using the resource, and a webinar demonstration is being held at 9 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time on Sept. 19, 2012. To join the webinar presentation, click here and enter your name and organization when prompted. To participate in the discussion forum, click here.

To keep users’ varying needs and interests in mind, information on the site is organized by both technical skills related to program planning, monitoring, and evaluating under such specific themes as frameworks, indicators, and data sources; and also by seven health program areas. The program areas are HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis, malaria, maternal and child health, neglected tropical diseases, reproductive health and family planning, water and sanitation, and general health.

“You get the materials that you want in a much more direct way,” says Jack Hazerjian of MEASURE Evaluation, who worked with the Measurement, Learning & Evaluation (MLE) Project to create the site.

The site includes a glossary of monitoring and evaluation terms, written guides, and links to outside resources. It also includes a five-minute video tutorial on how to use the site. The site “tries to consider where end users are coming from and orient them effectively to go where they need to go right away,” says Hazerjian.

The site’s simple style makes it accessible to users worldwide, he says, including those in areas where Internet browsers may not be able to handle data-rich content, such as lengthy videos and complex graphics. A Google Translate function is included, allowing text to be translated into other languages. The site will be updated periodically, with an eye on allowing users to find the tools and ideas to help them plan, monitor, and evaluate health programs all in one place.

MLE is funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and is based at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.