Total market value of all family planning products and services sold

 

Definition:

The total market value of all family planning (FP) products and services (i.e., contraceptive methods) sold. The total market value of all FP products and services is obtained by summing the market value of each specific product or service. For each type of FP product, each brand (and brand extension, where applicable) should be calculated separately, to account for differences in price. For FP services, data should be separated into the cost of the product (which will be calculated separately) and the cost of the clinical service, where possible. 

For each type of FP product, the calculation is as follows:

Market volume (number of units) x Cost to the consumer per unit

For each type of FP service, the calculation is as follows:

Total number of clinical services provided x Cost to consumer for the service

Data Sources:

Program data; service statistics (for the public sector); third-party expert data science company, such as IQVIA, that collects market value information.

Purpose:

Because total market approach (TMA) seeks to transform the market into a self-sustaining entity, indicators of market sustainability are important for any TMA analysis. 

Market value is an important indicator because it reflects willingness to pay for FP products, and may stimulate commercial interest. Market value is measured as the total value of all products or services sold or distributed to consumers, which is calculated using the average consumer price and product volume. Because the aim is to assess the commercial potential, free products and services do not contribute to market value.

Issue(s):

In theory, it is possible to estimate the value of products and services that are provided free of charge. However, such estimates would not be a useful indicator of the market potential, given that it is unknown how many users would be willing to pay for products or how much they would be willing to pay. Moreover, doing so would create an inconsistency in calculation because value of social marketing products is calculated using their retail price, rather than their actual value.

References:

Meekers, D., Haynes, S. C., & Kampa, K. (2016). Handbook for research on the family planning market, volume 2: Tool and resources for an in-depth analysis of the family planning market. Chapel Hill, NC, USA: MEASURE Evaluation, University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://www.measureevaluation.org/resources/publications/tr-16-131b