Cross-Border Health Integrated Partnership Project Performance and Costing Evaluation


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Author(s): Markiewicz, M., Weaver, E., Morris, L., & Xiong, K.

Year: 2020


Markiewicz, M., Weaver, E., Morris, L., & Xiong, K. (2020). Cross-Border Health Integrated Partnership Project Performance and Costing Evaluation. Chapel Hill, NC, USA: MEASURE Evaluation, University of North Carolina
Cross-Border Health Integrated Partnership Project Performance and Costing Evaluation Abstract:

East Africa and Southern Africa are the two regions most affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic worldwide. East Africa alone is home to more than six million people living with HIV/AIDS. People whose occupations require travel, such as truckers and fisherfolk, are a priority population with heightened risk for HIV. Many of the people who inhabit areas regularly visited by mobile populations are also part of this priority population.

The Cross-Border Health Integrated Partnership Project (CB-HIPP) worked from 2014–2019 to extend high-quality integrated health services to cross-border and mobile populations in strategic border areas and waterways in East Africa. As stakeholders consider a transition plan for CB-HIPP project activities, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) East Africa Mission contracted with MEASURE Evaluation, which is funded by USAID and the United States President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, to conduct a performance evaluation of CB-HIPP and to assess the cost of CB-HIPP programmatic scale-up. The performance evaluation gathered information about each component of the program’s Standard Package of activities, and the cost assessment developed a model to project the price of various scale-up scenarios.

Results indicate that the CB-HIPP model worked well to extend services to cross-border and mobile populations. Stakeholders were satisfied with the program and expressed interest in extending the reach and scope of the activity. The estimated cost of scaling up the program to six to ten additional sites ranges from $1.3–2.6 million per year. Costs vary based on the number of sites and type of implementing partner selected. At a dissemination meeting in February 2020, stakeholders discussed recommendations regarding the following topics: several operational modifications to the program, programmatic expansion, support for the continued development of the interoperable digital HMIS and portable insurance scheme, and work with stakeholders to build consensus on who will lead policy advocacy moving forward.